The landscape is subject to tremendous transformations at the hands of human interaction. Through control, ownership, and appropriation we have flattened the land and gradually altered the ecosystem over our time on Earth. While there are locations across the globe that can truly be considered wilderness the same cannot be said for England. The landscape is always subject to change whether it be natural or artificial. This can be observed in how we modify the physical properties of land and how such changes are cartographically and photographically represented.

Parkland aims to explore the national park, in the south, and what its purpose is in England. The focus is placed on human constructions and how they interact and intersect with the surroundings they have been placed in. These structures represent an increasing urbanization and separation from any kind of wilderness we might remember. Yet they are also a key element of our landscapes that serve as historical markers for our presence. These structures add some character and diversity to the landscape as well as allowing greater ease of access and use of the natural space both directly and indirectly.

Within the series there are abandoned remnants of industry alongside modern infrastructural achievements conflicting with seemingly natural elements; yet these too are remnants; they are a sign of a landscape once untamed but now completely influenced by mankind in every way. Therefore this project is both a documentation of locations as they are now and a realisation of what once was. Remnants of our alterations will remain present on the landscape long after the original constructions have become obsolete.


Gem Bridge

Meldon Dam

Air Raid Shelters

Roundhill Campsite

Beaulieu Road

Cadland Estate

Fawley Power Station

Butser Hill

Butser Hill Cement Works

Butser Hill Cement Works 2

Longmoor Army Camp

Cocking Lime Works 2

Cocking Lime Works

Shoreham Cement Works

Shoreham Bypass

Mile Oak Farm

Jill Windmill

New Haven

Seaford Beacon

Birling Gap